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August 12, 2009
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This journal entry has been in my mind for awhile, and now with having posted the article about artists deserving respect as paid professionals I think it’s time to give you my perspective on this.

What determines the price of art?  What is art worth?  Is it really worth anything?  Why should people buy art?

First of all, the major point in all of this is that the price of art is completely subjective, meaning that its value is mainly determined by the person viewing it.  The second part of the value of artwork is determined by the cost of materials, and the cost of the artist’s time, as well as how in demand their work is.  Then there are different price scales for Fine Artists, Graphic Artists, Illustrators, Freelance Artists, Web Designers, etc.  All of these factors add up to the price of artwork.

For my purposes, I will discuss Fine Art and Illustration, which is what I am most familiar with.

With fine art, the price tags can run incredibly high.  This is where the price is most subjective, because something that is crap to one person is priceless in worth to another.  Art speaks to all of us in different ways.

That’s all well and good, you may say, but what about those huge canvases that are just splatters of paint that my kid could do that sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars?  You can’t tell me that that kind of art justifies a price tag like that!  Yes I can, because, again, the price of art is mostly subjective.  For some people, standing in front of that canvas evokes an emotional reaction, and that is mainly where the value lies with fine art.  How does the art hit you?  How does it make you feel?  Does it make you think?  Does it carry you away?  What does it say to you?  If art makes you think or feel, immediately you are drawn to it, and if your reaction is strong enough you want to possess it, sometimes at all costs.  Then you may look at the technique, how this or that was done, the brushstrokes here or the lines there, especially if it is an original work.  There is nothing that compares to the power of seeing your favorite piece of art “in the flesh” before you.  Here you can marvel at the workmanship and craft of art, and for some, nothing but the original will do (and I cannot blame anyone a bit for that).  

Then there is the reputation and notoriety of the artist to factor in.  How in demand are they?  How does their artwork sell?  If the artist has a great reputation, amazing talent, and a lengthy history of being in demand that jacks the price way, way up.  And why not?  The price of anything is determined by supply and demand.  If an artist is highly in demand, but only makes X amount of pieces a year, then the price of X pieces can be incredibly high.

So this also factors into the price of the artist’s time.  What is their time worth to them along with their talents?  What is their time worth to others?  If they are in demand, their time is worth a lot.  

In the field of illustration it is a bit different.  Illustrators can also be highly in demand for their time and talents, but they may not make as much as a fine artist.  Then again, there are those who do illustration that crosses over into the fine art arena, such as Michael Whelan and many other “book cover” artists.  Most of us may never reach that level of notoriety and demand, however there –is- an industry standard for this kind of work.

If you would like to see the current industry standards for pricing in the fields of Illustration and Graphic Arts, the Graphic Artists Guild puts out their “Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook: Pricing & Ethical Guidelines” every few years with current, up-to-date pricing information that is based on real industry surveys.  You can order the handbook here:  www.graphicartistsguild.org/ha… will give you a good guideline to refer to in the pricing of your own work.

As for the cost of materials, this should definitely be factored in.  We all know how much materials cost us artists, from paints and canvas and markers, to Wacom tablets and expensive software.  Sometimes the materials cost can be very low, such as a pencil piece on sketch paper.  However, prices for materials can skyrocket if you are buying high-end paints and especially if you are working with precious metals and gems (such as with bronze sculptures and jewelry).  These things cost, and sometimes a lot, and you should definitely get your materials cost back in the price tag.

All that said, you can now see how the price of art can be all over the map.  If you are unfamiliar with how to price your own work, do some research.  How much does similar artwork (in skill and complexity) go for?  What are other people charging?  What is the industry standard?  How in demand are you, and what do you personally feel your time and talents are worth?  You’ll start to get a picture of where you should start from, and according to your demand adjust your prices from there.  

For myself, I have been building up my pricing system slowly over the years.  When I first started out, my prices for originals and commissions were pretty low because I wasn’t well known and no idea what my art was worth.  I would do a 9” X 12” full color piece with a background for less than $100.  And I was pounced on continually until, exhausted and unable to complete my commissions in a timely manner, I –had- to raise my prices.  As my reputation and demand grew, I steadily raised my prices more and more until the demand for my time and talents balanced out nicely with what I was able to produce in a timely manner.  Currently my prices are right where I want them, making it so that I am not overwhelmed with work while making the work satisfying and worth it.  People still pay my prices, and I can get their art done in a relatively good time frame without burnout.   

For example, I have a -massive- amount of people who would love to commission me, and I don't have a whole lot of time to devote to art for others (or, let's face it, art at all).  That's why I am currently doing these "small" commissions (badges, bookmarks, etc).  They are far, far more affordable than my normal full-size (9 X 12 and larger) commissions, they take less time to do, I can take several at a time and the price makes it worth my while.  This means I don't get burned out, and I can them done in a reasonable amount of time.  Plus the commissioner gets a custom original of mine, and one that usually exceeds their expectations, which justifies the cost to them.  Thus, everyone wins (even though my prices are far more than the norm for similar sized work).  

So you see that, while someone’s prices may seem ridiculous to one person, to another they are worth every penny.  Just remember that the price of art is subjective, so do some research, and adjust your prices so that your output equals your demand to a comfortable degree.  But never, ever sell yourself short.  Give yourself some respect, because an artist, you deserve it :)
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:iconisaidrawr:
IsaidRAWR Featured By Owner Jan 1, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Reply
:iconlittlepalmtree:
LittlePalmTree Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2010
Can I translate it? O_o
Reply
:icongladiatorm88:
GladiatorM88 Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2010
I do believe that you are correct in this. While i do not do commissions my self i hope to become good enough to do them in the future. This article you have written has told me a lot about what i need to consider when pricing my commissions. I also agree that certain fields to take a higher cost over others due to materials needed. However i also believe the the #1 factor in price is notoriety. If you are a nobody you will barely make cost of your art. however if you are famous you will make anywhere from 10=1000 times the base cost of the art work.
Reply
:icontatsu000:
Tatsu000 Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2010  Professional Traditional Artist
I think the price of art of DA is very low, & if I find a kickass artist, I'll be willing to pay $50-70 for a colored artwork with original. That is low. I at one point was holding commissions & they were hella cheap. I mean like $5 for Sketch, $10 for Lineart, & $20 for Color, with a $5 extra charge to send the original to you through mail.

Yeah, so cheap, besides Pro-Artist outside of DA make 5 times what some are charging ($50-70) to make one image.
Reply
:icongalefra:
galefra Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2009
In the article you didn't mention your current prices and I looked on your gallery but couldn't find a link to your prices. Often this is the issue, artists don't know where others have their price point so they don't know where to set their own.

Awhile back I emailed a fellow artist on deviantart because we were both being commissioned by the same company in Mumbai to sell some of our art. I foolishly thought that as fellow artists we could collaborate together to ensure that we both got an equitable price. When I emailed her she replied in a very curt manner and said she doesn't share this type of information with others, and told me to "get lost" unless I was interested in purchasing some of her art. I was shocked, surprised and a let down. I thought artists should band together as comrades, instead of rivals.
Reply
:iconmeihua:
meihua Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2009
This is the one that should be the news article, not the Craigslist warning :P
Reply
:iconsuperpower-pnut:
superpower-pnut Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2009
There was an epi of 'Amazing Animals' on AP not long ago, where a horse would paint. they'd offer the brush, and he wouls slather as he saw fit. He had his own agent in NYC, where ppl bid thousands to own one, and they were given fancy gallery names.

However, repos were shown to on-the-street folk, who couldn't believe the prices paid (one even said "I ned to get home and pick up some supplies for *my* horse!)

They were interesting works (as were the ones we saw the elephant do at my local zoo), but still looking very much like the floor of an elementary art class. Which brings up another question: Is it really childish and sloppy, or just some primordial expression?
Reply
:iconprismakat:
prismakat Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
I wish that I could fav this journal entry so that I could show it to ppl that try to talk me out of my prices for my artwork.
Reply
:iconwolvenlied:
wolvenlied Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2009
same here
Reply
:iconkgbigelow:
KGBigelow Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2009  Professional General Artist
Read "What is Art?" by Leo Tolstoy - It'll give you a good look into the cruel sentiments of the non-artist.
Reply
:iconbasbird:
BASbird Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2009  Student General Artist
ah, so the law of supply and demand applies here too? I didn't know that, though I should have expected it, thanks, I've been needing this!

I have NO extra money right now, but MARK MY WORDS, I shall get a commission from you soon!!
Reply
:icono0aquadragon0o:
o0AquaDragon0o Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Totally agree with this, it has also helped me debate on prices a little bit more too.

Btw.. What are badges?
Reply
:iconcozmicdreamer:
CozmicDreamer Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2009
A particular media of mine deals with that dilemma of material cost and the time it takes to finish. The biggest example, is my 'Baby Winter Dragon sculpt' [link]
I will doubt this one will find a buyer any time soon. :sniff: But, I will not lower his price even if I am desperate.

I struggle with the value quotient all the time...people close to me tell me I am constantly selling myself short, (even if they are a bit biased) But, being an artist IS my only source of income. I need to charge the prices I do.

People all too readily take what I do for granted. Everyone seems to think that they should be able to pay me for my work, the prices that they see in discount stores! (All stuff made in other countries by 'sweat shops' and mass-produced in warehouses!) This really angers me! :steaming:
All of my work is One-Of-A-Kind and Original!!! :rage:

I wish people would GET A CLUE, and realize how special a piece really is! :XD:

Thanks for spreading the truth!
Reply
:iconmonochromecrystal:
MonochromeCrystal Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2009  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Damn... that is a beautiful sculpture. I support your decision and hope that someone will take him home. I would if I could~
Reply
:iconcozmicdreamer:
CozmicDreamer Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2009
:aww: Thank you! Maybe someday.... although the longer he stays with me, the more attached I get to him. :heart:
Reply
:iconmonochromecrystal:
MonochromeCrystal Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2009  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Indeed, it is as hard to part with an awesome piece of work as it is to part with a child. But, if it happens, it is a good kind of sadness because someone else gets to appreciate the beauty you made with your own two hands.
Reply
:iconcozmicdreamer:
CozmicDreamer Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2009
I couldn't have said it better!
Reply
:iconmonochromecrystal:
MonochromeCrystal Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2009  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:D
Reply
:icontakamo:
takamo Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
I am really loving these artist journals you've been putting up. I wanted to read all of them before I put in my two cents. I feel that a lot of people could learn a lot from these last three journals of yours! I know that I, myself have fairly low costs as I simply do mine with paper, pencil, ink and colored pencils. I think my highest price right now is, well 20 bucks CND.

And I did it that way because of the fact, like you said, that I am starting out with commissions and I'm not known at all. I've had 2, so far and one of those is a fairly good friend of mine way down in West Virginia.

How does a person expand their advertisements? I have mine up in my LJ and on my DA in previous journals..and more recently in the bottom section of my DA journal. I'm thinking about asking my manager at work to see if I could put a little piece of paper up for people at work to know.

But, once I told my spouse that, she told me to be careful since people tend to want realism, which I can't rightly do. (I do try to practice, but it always comes out with a hint of cartooniness.) So I just wondered, if you had any advice for me?
Reply
:iconrb-illustration:
RB-Illustration Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2010   Digital Artist
I know you made this comment ages ago, so I apologise in advance if you don't need my advice at all by now, but I thought I'd give you my advice for getting spotted. =) About a year ago I was doing a Graphic Design course and we had to design a poster for a local company. I made one for the local goth shop and they decided in the end to display it in the window, even though they didn't have to. (I then got a discount off an awesome pair of boots from them for doing that ;)) The poster was then spotted by two guys who are making a roleplay game and they commissioned me for some character designs. At about the same time, I sent my artwork to Neo, a UK manga magazine, and after that I got contacted by an anime merchandise company called BFTP, who paid me 350 to design them a logo and mascot character. At the moment I'm focusing on trying to get good enough to get featured in ImagineFX and Digital Artist magazines. It's all about looking for the big corporations and aiming to get as much exposure as possible - and occasionally, in my case, luck, unfortunately. ^^; My teachers have also suggested things such as designing greetings cards and little cheap things like that and offering them to shops and saying what profit you want if you sell them, and then coming back and hoping they'll be honest and pay you what you earned, and even order more cards. It's a risk, but it's worth a shot. I'm planning on designing some Celtic/pagan cards and giving them to some local shops that are into New Age stuff and seeing how it works out. =)
Reply
:icondrazzielder:
DrazziElder Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2010  Student General Artist
I'm not Goldenwolf by far but the best thing you can do is expose your art in as many places as you can. In this modern era that means lots of online art communities like conceptart, deviantart and many others. Try to practice different techniques and composition in pieces for variety, that way your art will fit what more people are searching for. Perfect your craft and apply discipline and order, a commissioner that wants his money well spent looks for these characteristics. Like Goldenwolf said, one of the issues an artist has to deal with is the demand for his art, now I'm not saying you should copy what other artists do at all but you should work towards what people want to buy. It is after all business, and for a product, artistic or otherwise to be sold it has to be wanted by the people. Just keep that one in mind. Now I am by no means a great artist but I'm working on it not only by practice but by educating myself in how the industry of art works like. My two cents, friend.

Sallie
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:iconfuegokid:
fuegokid Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2009  Student Filmographer
Without art the would would be grey and boring.
People depend on art more than they realize.
That is why they buy art at all.


As for prices, it's a difficult thing indeed.
I'm currently struggling a bit with it myself.
I want people to buy, I know some will, but I don't want to scare people away with the prices because I know people can be darn cheap and all "uhh...dun wanna spend money", I tend to be like that too. Normally that's because people that know about your art is the ones with the least money, therefore they don't want to pay too much.
Reply
:iconleopreston:
Leopreston Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2009  Professional General Artist
This is really informative and an excellent outlook. Once again Goldie, you tell it how it is. ;)
Reply
:iconmphoenix169:
Mphoenix169 Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Student Traditional Artist
you have the best journal entries and for that I thank you :D
Reply
:iconpearlwhitecrow:
PearlWhitecrow Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
*applauds* you kick ass sister
Reply
:iconwindseeker:
WindSeeker Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Do you know if there are any similar resources for those of us who work in digital mediums (photoshop, painter, etc)

*has no real idea how to price her own work*
Reply
:icongoldenwolf:
Goldenwolf Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Yeah, the Graphic Artists Guild Handbook covers all that as well :)
Reply
:iconwindseeker:
WindSeeker Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Cool, thanks :)
Reply
:iconpadmejem:
padmejem Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009
I just might grab that handbook.
Reply
:iconzephyrelric:
ZephyrElric Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Student General Artist
I can't think of a sensible reply to this at the moment, but I wholeheartedly agree. I think a lot more people should be able to understand things like this...
Reply
:iconmistingwolf:
MistingWolf Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
I only get commissions for my bead work from, ironically, the local Ojibwe [which is funny cause I'm white], so I must be doing something right. Materials are cheap, but the work takes a little while [hiding the threads is a huge pain and it's my least-favorite part, but I always wanna see what it looks like when I'm finally done].
Reply
:iconravenfire5:
Ravenfire5 Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
yeah, i can agree on this. i thought the way you can piece you work is how talented you are, someone who is really good at what they do, people would willing to pay anything for it and probably the artists that are not to talented, people would think their art is not worth it. i used to get angry at artist that do that spatter art and sell in for thousands of dollars, but the artist could well-known so it makes sense.
Reply
:iconmeredithdillman:
MeredithDillman Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
I'd add that setting prices by judging the market on DA will only lead to underpricing oneself. If you want to offer prices that seem more affordable here be specific about what you will do or offer something like head shots or no background for a certain price.
Reply
:iconlovecube:
LoveCube Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009
"That’s all well and good, you may say, but what about those huge canvases that are just splatters of paint that my kid could do that sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars? You can’t tell me that that kind of art justifies a price tag like that! Yes I can...[]"

I can't. The reason simply being this: [link]

Don't get me wrong, to each their own of course, but I don't believe in 'abstract' art and it having any value. To me, this article proves that abstract artwork is more of an illusion than anything else. It's an excuse for people to pretend they understand something they don't understand, just to look better than those who 'don't get it'. For as far as I'm concerned, there's nothing to get. :P

If people are willing to pay a lot of money for it, then they are free to do so. I encourage them, in fact, to do that if it makes them happy.

But I can't help but feel I need to disagree when people say they buy something like an abstract piece because it triggers an 'emotion' in them. I think it's more the result of wanting to stand out because it makes them feel different, or better than everyone else.

... That actually doesn't have much to do in regards to pricing. Because, yeah, if it makes them happy, who are we to say "No you can't!"? I just felt compelled to share this because your words reminded me of that article. :P
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:iconrb-illustration:
RB-Illustration Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2010   Digital Artist
I LOVE YOU. D8< I so agree. I'm glad I'm not the only one! :XD: We have a contemporary art gallery that's been recently built in my town and my teachers spend all their time harping on about how wonderful it is while telling me that 'no one draws and paints any more' and that I'll never get anywhere with illustration. XD
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:icongoldenwolf:
Goldenwolf Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Once again, subjectivity. Someone might see that, might even know it's done by a toddler, might now the full details about it (that it's done with ketchup and such) and think it's the neatest thing in the world. And if they have money, they will shell out for it. If that happens does it make it "worth" that? I think it does, because, well, someone bought it for thousands of dollars already didn't they?

To some, abstract art is the only "real" art. Art that takes little talent or vision can sell for tens of thousands, and that's, again, because of subjectivity. One man's crap is another man's treasure, regardless of the reasons why they buy it.

Other than that, I totally agree with you about abstract art. I don't get it, I don't really like it, but sometimes (just sometimes) I -can- appreciate it.

Thanks for your comment!
Reply
:icondittin03:
dittin03 Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
I have this problem consistently, especially as lately I have also -had- to up my prices. It wasn't an easy thing for me to do, but I am still able to get commissions at a rate that is manageable for me. I will never take on a commission without thinking I can complete it in a timely manner and to the best of my abilities. I want to give them all that they pay for while also being fair to myself. So when I get that person saying my prices are outrageous, it really doesn't bother me because I know that isn't true. In fact, I am probably -still- underselling myself. When I get myself a decent reputation I'm sure that will change. I wish more people understood how many years of work it takes to be able to produce a nice piece of artwork. It really should count for something later on when all that hard work starts to finally pay off. When we put years of our lives into learning a trade that we eventually use to pay ourselves back with, we realize we truly are professionals and what we do is specialty work. The real gem in art too is that every artist is so unique and that is reflected in our artwork that we put so much of ourselves into.
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:icondranx:
Dranx Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009
I've recently opened myself up for commissions, and this is a very good read. I've spoken to people over the years who scoff at the idea of paying any kind of money for works done in colored pencil or pen, because they're ignorant as to the price of materials (I recently bought a few replacements for my prismacolor set... 9 pencils cost me $20), and apparently don't think about my time, which is something that's factored in for virtually every other job in the world.
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:iconstarrydance:
Starrydance Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009
Pricing is where I struggle the most. For things like prints, etc, its easy to just follow the market.

For originals and commissions I always get overwhelmed. Thank you for the insight - it does help to occasionally remember that what people are paying for (our time and our talent) is something that we should be charging for.

I forget that a lot.
Reply
:iconallinix:
AlliNix Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Student Digital Artist
i...have some questions...about pricing art and such. i was maybe wondering if, since this journal is along the same topic and you seem to have a good handle on it, you might be able to help me out, through notes?
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:icongoldenwolf:
Goldenwolf Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Go ahead and note me and I will see if I can help :)
Reply
:iconthepariah-kitty:
thepariah-kitty Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009
I've seen several journals discussing the price of art and how or why prices differ.
~mistressofspam did a good one with [link]
You explained things very well, and I'm happy to see it all in words. There is so much more involved in the pricing in art besides simply the cost of materials, which is what the naive commissioner/buyer often only considers.
Thank you for this. =]
Reply
:icongatekat:
Gatekat Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Hobbyist Writer
I agree completely. Even when I don't understand the reasoning behind why X values Y art so much, I understand that they value it, just as I value what I own. I know I always look at an artist's gallery and price it in my head for it's value to me before I decide where on the scale of 'great deal' to 'out of their mind greedy' their prices fall for me. It has little to do with their skill and never with their status. It's all about how the art hits me in that first moment, and how it hits me a month later.
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:iconsugarpoultry:
sugarpoultry Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
Well, with the economy being bad as it is, some artists should be wary about it. Also, I agree with most of what you said.

Plus it does depend on how popular an artist is and the quality of their work. You are one of the best anthro artists in the world (at least one of the most well known to the community), so in your case of course there will be thousands of people willing to pay hundreds of dollars for your unique art.

Me, I'm not so popular, getting there, but until then with my endless amount of free time, I keep my prices low because I know how expensive others' are, and I want people to have the opportunity to commission something without emptying their bank account to do it, especially with how bad the economy is right now. I keep my commissions list full and I've made hundreds of dollars each month. Most artists only have 1 or two commissions and make the same amount as I do. Course, they have different situations and their art is far more valuable than mine, but it evens out, so it depends on the person.

Even if I did gain more popularity, I would still keep my prices low because someone like me, who wishes I could commission someone like you, will never be able to because I don't have that much money, so I'm thinking purely from the point of view of my buyers and how they feel. Needless to say because I keep my prices low, my popularity is rising because of such a good 'deal' I offer, which is good, because once it gets to a point where I can't handle 6 commissions at a time, I will raise my prices, but not very much. I still want it to be an attainable price for middle to low class people wanting to see their characters come to life.

Anyways, this was too long. haha
Reply
:icongoldenwolf:
Goldenwolf Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Oh absolutely. I think you totally "get" what I am saying here :) Keep your prices where they are comfortable at -for you-, and what will attract buyers for you.

I have a -massive- amount of people who would love to commission me, and I don't have a whole lot of time to devote to art for others (or, let's face it, art at all). That's why I am currently doing these "small" commissions (badges, bookmarks, etc). They are far, far more affordable than my normal full-size (9 X 12 and larger) commissions, I can take several at a time and the price makes it worth my while. This means I don't get burned out, and I can them done in a reasonable amount of time. Plus the commissioner gets a custom original of mine, and one that usually exceeds their expectations, which justifies the cost to them. Thus, everyone wins (even though my prices are far more than the norm for similar sized work).

Hmmm. I think I will add this in to the post. I think it helps explain some things.

Thanks!
Reply
:iconsugarpoultry:
sugarpoultry Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
I think your badges and bookmarks are awesome, and one day I WILL get one! Haha
Reply
:iconwolfesskiss:
WolfessKiss Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Professional General Artist
Agreed, if its just a hobby..

However we are talking about being a professional artist, meaning that it's your job.
If your trying to live on being an artist then you need to up your prices.

Being popular on DA is worth nothing in the real world. If your going to an interview then your either good or your just not.


Why the cost?
Living cost of a apartment or home, plus food, heat, a car.. its really difficult for someone to JUST be an artist and nothing more. Now a days artists have to have another job, or a 'real job' which really irks me..I spend a solid 3 days straight for any traditional painting, if you want to offer me $10 for something I spent a good 36 hours on then thats like paying me $3.60 an hour.. cant live on that.

Commissions?
Personal art made exspecially for them..
Okay so now they EXPECT you to buy the paint, brushes, supplies.. to take time out of your hectic life.. its just ridiculous.
I have family members who TELL me to paint cartoons on their kids walls.. I dont have the time or supplies to do that. If they want me to take time off of work to work for them for free they have another thing coming.
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:iconsugarpoultry:
sugarpoultry Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
Ah, its true. It's her career, and well, its mine too, but I'm married and I have a husband who provides the main income for us (including my daughter), so we could live fine if we didn't have my art, but we have benefited greatly from it from time to time. Sometimes it has saved us. Haha!

Well you'd be surprised how many people run into me asking me if I'm sugarpoultry from dA. It does help, but you're right its not essential. But the reason why commissions are so high for her is because of her amazing art (which itself is popular, not the person itself necessarily. And I'm sure Christy gets noticed outside of dA all the time. haha

And yah, she needs to raise the price for cost of supplies, I don't. I use only photoshop CS4 and hardly ever do traditional, so yah, we are very different. :XD:
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WolfessKiss Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Professional General Artist
Straight digital is defiantly a different story then :) (unless your printing high quality =__=)

Paints are SO expensive, and canvas's.. ah, the average jo-shmo has no idea.
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sugarpoultry Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
I agree, and goldenwolf has every right to charge lots for it. Though, I really do like her digital, but she doesn't really have prices up for it. :(

Well I have a few paints and stuff, but I buy cheep, but if you do it a ton and all the time, yah, I totally understand.
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